HOMEFaculty ≫ ARIMOTO, Yutaka

ARIMOTO, Yutaka

Associate Professor / Research Division of Comparative and World Economics
Specialization: 
Development economics, Agricultural economics, Economic history

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Previous research

My research thus far has aimed to understand and address socioeconomic issues in two areas: developing economies across the world and agriculture in contemporary Japan.
 
In my research on developing economies, in addition to examining the contemporary issues faced by such economies, I analyzed how the same issues arose in Japan during its period as a developing country and how Japan solved (or failed to solve) them. In doing so, I sought to derive lessons and policy implications from Japan’s historical experience. The specific issues that I addressed include the efficiency of tenancy contracts on agricultural land, the impact of community-driven development programs, the economic effects of industrial clusters on productivity, and issues related to agricultural marketing and distribution. I applied both theoretical and empirical (microeconomic data analysis) approaches in this research.
 
My research on agriculture in contemporary Japan focused, in particular, on the reallocation of agricultural land for more efficient use in the age of mechanization. I have published research findings on the characteristics and limitations of the Japanese agricultural land market and on the clustering of agricultural land (through replotting and exchange or consolidation of land).
 

Current research projects

I am currently moving forward with projects in three main areas.
 
The first research area involves contemporary developing countries. I am conducting research on agricultural marketing and traders’ arbitrage in Madagascar and Cambodia and human trafficking in Thailand and Cambodia.
 
The second area is concerned with economic development in prewar Japan. I am approaching this topic by applying the motivations and methodologies of development economics. I examine how development issues arose in this period and how Japan solved (or failed to solve) them. I am also conducting a research project in collaboration with other researchers from the field of development economics and Japanese economic history. Currently, we are focusing on several topics related to agriculture: dissemination of technology, governance of fake fertilizers, agricultural insurance and finance, agricultural marketing and quality standards, and investment in and maintenance of irrigation facilities.
 
The third research area entails quantitative analysis of Japanese economic history. I draw from a broad array of historical data, ranging from the micro level (household surveys, household registers, and census of factories) to the regional level (districts, cities, and prefectures). I am carrying out research using population registers from the Nihonmatsu Domain in premodern Japan, along with unique household-level data from various surveys conducted by the National Research Institute of Agricultural Economics in the 1930s. 
 

Keywords

development microeconomics, farmland tenancy, farmland consolidation